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JKM > Volume 45(1); 2024 > Article
Oh, Kim, Kim, and Park: The short-term effect of Blood Pressure Reduction after Biofeedback in Malignant Hypertension: A case report

Abstract

Objectives

The purpose of this study was to report the short-term blood pressure-lowering effects observed in a patient with malignant hypertension through slow breathing maneuver with heart rate variability(HRV) biofeedback.

Methods

Biofeedback sessions, totaling 13, each lasting 10 minutes, were administered. Blood pressure was measured pre and post-treatment, as well as thrice daily at 10 am, 4 pm, and 8 pm. Systolic blood pressure(SBP), diastolic blood pressure(DBP), and pulse rate were recorded for comparative analysis.

Results

Before biofeedback, the average SBP, DBP, and pulse rate were 227.2±18.3, 135.2±11.0, and 104.4±5.3, respectively. Immediately post-biofeedback, these values changed to 213.7±15.2, 126.9±8.5, and 99.2±3.6. However, sustained long-term blood pressure reduction was not observed.

Conclusions

The findings suggest that biofeedback therapy induces a short-term reduction in blood pressure in cases of malignant hypertension, potentially associated with autonomic nervous system regulation. Integrating biofeedback with other Korean medicine treatments, such as acupuncture or moxibustion, may offer a comprehensive approach for managing malignant hypertension.

Fig. 1
Introduction of Biofeedback program.
① The blue line is pacer. The patient should breathe in and breathe out following the yellow dot. ② The indicators are VLF, LF and HF of heart rate variability from the left. ③ The pink line is the data of respiratory sinus arrhythmia. Blue and brown lines are the data of respiration sensors. ④ Compensation video is activated when breathing at the resonance frequency.
jkm-45-1-249f1.gif
Table 1
Changes of Blood Pressure after Biofeedback on Malignant Hypertension Patient
Date 12/6 12/7 12/9 12/12 12/13 12/14 12/16 12/18 12/19 12/20 12/22 12/23 12/27 Mean±SD
Before biofeedback SBP (mmHg) 239 224 207 214 206 223 239 236 250 258 244 207 206 227.2±18.3
DBP (mmHg) 150 134 130 128 132 124 146 147 130 155 133 131 117 135.2±11.0
PR 106 106 95 102 103 94 114 108 106 106 106 104 107 104.4±5.3
After biofeedback SBP (mmHg) 231 189 193 204 212 218 235 213 212 227 230 220 194 213.7±15.2*
DBP (mmHg) 129 122 117 124 123 141 141 127 124 123 137 129 113 126.9±8.5*
PR 102 96 92 100 101 97 105 98 96 97 103 102 101 99.2±3.6*
Daily BP (AM10) SBP (mmHg) 226 218 221 224 221 225 226 226 219 225 221 225 223 223.1±2.8
DBP (mmHg) 124 120 120 120 119 124 127 125 120 126 120 124 120 122.2±2.8
PR 78 83 79 86 78 88 86 79 83 81 81 85 82 82.2±3.3
Daily BP (PM4) SBP (mmHg) 234 227 228 223 228 234 237 231 232 234 232 233 235 231.4±3.9
DBP (mmHg) 128 125 126 127 124 127 129 127 125 128 126 125 126 126.4±1.4
PR 84 81 82 79 87 91 95 76 88 87 87 79 87 84.8±5.3
Daily BP (PM8) SBP (mmHg) 246 235 237 245 236 239 246 248 238 239 234 238 248 240.7±5.1
DBP (mmHg) 134 126 128 131 125 129 133 132 129 131 127 129 133 129.8±2.8
PR 109 94 94 108 94 103 114 113 92 98 84 97 114 101.1±9.8

SBP, systolic blood pressure; DBP, diastolic blood pressure; PR, pulse rate; SD, standard deviation;

* p<0.05 on paired t-test of before and after biofeedback

참고문헌

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8. Jung SY, Hwang YC, Cho SY, Lee HG, Kwon SW, Jung WS, Moon SK, Park JM, Ko CN, Park SU. Effect of Acupuncture on Patients with Hypertension : A Review of Clinical Studies in the Republic of Korea. The Journal of the Society of Stroke on Korean Medicine. 2022; 23:1. 25–40. (Korean).


9. Kim HI, Yoo JH, Kim GW, Koo BS. A Case of Autogenic training and Acupuncture treatment on facial tremor by neurofeedback. J of Oriental Neuropsychiatry. 2005; 16:2. 181–188. (Korean).


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